Reviving the Palos Verdes Reservoir—Part 2

April 1st, 2018

The October/November 2016 issue of Geosynthetics published Part 1 of this series on revitalizing the Palos Verdes Reservoir in Los Angeles County, California. That article described the approach to revitalizing the site, as well as the five-month-long geosynthetic manufacturing and fabrication phase. In Part 2, we continue to explore more of the inner workings for […]

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Controlling uplifting gas bubbles in exposed geomembrane-lined ponds—Part 3

April 1st, 2018

Part 1 of this series (Thiel 2017) demonstrated how the size, shape, pressure, and stresses and strains experienced by geomembrane bubbles inflated with gas could be analytically estimated. Part 2 of this series (Thiel 2018) evaluated the considerations for incorporating a gas-venting underdrain below the geomembrane liner. The current, and final, Part 3 of this […]

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Protecting geomembranes from animal damage

June 1st, 2017

Resisting animal and insect attacks on geomembranes is an interesting problem. Geomembrane installers and manufacturers have had numerous geomembranes damaged by bears, deer, coyotes, birds, beavers, and ground squirrels (Figures 1 and 2). In most cases, the damage is incidental to something else the animal is seeking. Deer damage the liner with their hooves trying […]

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Geomembrane waterproofing for a 10-mile wooden flume

October 1st, 2016

Introduction In 2015, a private hydroelectric company in Washington state was looking to install a geosynthetic liner as part of a 16-km (10-mi) elevated wood and metal structure for conveying water—a flume. The project was located near Mount Rainier (Photo 1) about 50 miles southeast of Seattle in southwestern Washington’s Pierce County. The owner operates […]

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